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Team Lunette and The Cup are on a mission

TheCup.org focuses on the rights and needs of menstrual care, medical assistance and education for adolescent girls. To ensure success the community at large is involved: boys, parents, schools and elders receive training.

30 11 2015

Team Lunette and TheCup.org are on a mission to get menstrual cups in the hands of girls in Kenya and India.

TheCup.org focuses on the rights and needs of menstrual care, medical assistance and education for adolescent girls. To ensure success the community at large is involved: boys, parents, schools and elders receive training.

The Cup program consists of 4 sessions that take place in schools in a 2-4 week period. The training session topics include puberty, menstrual health, human rights, abortion, STDs, prostitution, and the importance of education.

Menstrual cups are also offered during the program. Because the cup is made of medical grade silicone and can be reused for several years, it’s a sustainable solution to an underprivileged girl’s biggest challenges while menstruating.

An important part of The Cup’s program and the key to their success is the mentorship and peer counseling. Girls who have suffer/suffered from sexual abuse or other challenges are able to discuss their situations in a safe environment.

The Cup program is designed to be cost-efficient and scalable. In four months this past spring (2015) 1,000 girls were trained in how to use a menstrual cup in Kibera slum in Nairobi. To help ensure menstrual cup success The Cup team revisits the schools to follow up o the user acceptance of the menstrual cup.

To find out how you can help The CUP Foundation and Lunette cup make periods healthier and safer check out TheCup.Org's "Take Action" link here. 100% of every donation will be used to invest in girls in poverty, give them training and a menstrual cup that will last 10 years!

The Harsh Facts

(From TheCup.Org)

  • Studies show that girls miss up to 20 % of their school time each year because they are afraid of staining their clothes or are lacking a solution for handling their bleeding.
  • In some cases, girls have no options available and are forced to sell themselves to be able to buy pads, which puts them at risk of HIV and aids and other sexual diseases, teenage pregnancy, illegal abortions and the risk of falling into prostitution.
  • One school study in Ethiopia reported over 50% of girls missing between one and four days of school per month due to menstruation.
  • 48% of girls in Iran believe that menstruation is a disease. (WSSCC, A change of tide, India, 2012)

Check out more “Harsh Facts” here.

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